TBI logo 

Yom Shishi, 6 Kislev 5778
First Chanukah 1976
Directory of Charter Members 1977
Our first Bar Mitzvah 1978
Receiving our charter 1980
Bagel Boy! 1983
First joint B'nei Mitvah 1983
Sukkot 1983
Sukkot 1983
Our first Torah! 1984
1984
1984
High Holy Days 1984
Second joint B'nei Mitzvah 1986
Shabbat at Pilgrim 1987
Re-Dedication 1989
Our Past
Replacement
New headstone 1989
Baby's Grave  marker 1990
Friendship
Tu B'Shevat 1991
Tu B'Shvat
First Adult B'nei Mitzvah 1995
Half the B'nei Mitzvah
Leslie Coburn
1995
Adult B'nei Mitzvah

First Chanukah 1976

Edith Proctor & Phyllis Glaser

Directory of Charter Members 1977

Our first Bar Mitzvah 1978

Receiving our charter 1980

Rabbi Hershman presents Al with charter from UAHC

Bagel Boy! 1983

CBI bagel booth at art fair

First joint B'nei Mitvah 1983

Clifford & Robyn

Sukkot 1983

Muriel & Chris Licker decorate sukkah

Sukkot 1983

Our first Torah! 1984

1984

Al Weissberg & Carolyn Martinez

1984

Phyllis Glaser & Mary McCallister

High Holy Days 1984

Second joint B'nei Mitzvah 1986

Aaron & Michelle

Shabbat at Pilgrim 1987

Re-Dedication 1989

Our Past

Replacement

New headstone 1989

Baby's Grave marker 1990

Friendship

Jan, Millie, & Phyllis

Tu B'Shevat 1991

Tu B'Shvat

First Adult B'nei Mitzvah 1995

Half the B'nei Mitzvah

Larry, Karla, Phyllis G, Muriel, Phyllis B, Millie

Leslie Coburn

1995

Muriel, Rabbi David, & Phyllis

Adult B'nei Mitzvah

Mo assists Bonnie LaRose
Saturday, November 25, 2017

 

  A Jewish presence in Shasta County was first evident in the 1800s, brought by the merchants who settled here during the Gold Rush Era. They formed the Jewish Benevolent Society in order to establish and maintain consecrated ground for burials. In 1872, the Shasta County Supervisors deeded land to them to establish a cemetery. This land, located on both sides of Highway 299 west of Old Shasta, now belongs to Temple Beth Israel. A State Historical Marker at the site identifies a Jewish baby’s grave: that of Charles Brownstein who died Dec  14, 1864, infant son of George and Helena Brownstein of Red Bluff. When the railroad was put through downtown Redding, the center of commerce and transportation shifted and the community dispersed.

 


  Temple Beth Israel began with a luncheon of interested women in Shingletown. Their enthusiasm sparked a meeting of other families who organized the Redding Jewish Community Center on November 10, 1976. On April 25, 1980, the Center received a charter from the Union of American Hebrew Congregations* under the new name of Congregation Beth Israel.

 


    In our early days, we met and prayed in many places. In 1981, we began a 15-year relationship with Pilgrim Congregational Church as our center of congregational life. As welcoming as our friends at Pilgrim were, we longed for a place to call our own. In December 1996, we acquired our current building on Placer Rd, our Torah scroll and prayerbooks no longer had to be intinerant.  Shortly thereafter we changed our name to Temple Beth Israel of Redding.


 

*Now the Union of Reform Judaism (URJ)